Is Rosetta Stone’s popular language learning app worth the money?

Is Rosetta Stone’s popular language learning app worth the money?

If you’re thinking about learning a new language-whether because you’re bored in quarantine, planning an international move, or just want to be more cultured-chances are Rosetta Stone is one of the first language-learning programs that pops into your head. This system has been around since 1992, when it used to require CD-ROMs (remember those?), and it’s arguably the best-known tool for learning a new language.

However, Rosetta Stone isn’t cheap-prices start at $80 for a three-month subscription-and you might be wondering if it’s really better than free language-learning apps like Duolingo or other less expensive options like Mondly. After testing the program for around a month, here’s what we think you need to know about Rosetta Stone-and whether it’s worth your hard-earned money.

As you may have figured out by now, Rosetta Stone is a computer-assisted language-learning tool, and today, it offers 24 language programs, including both popular options like Spanish, Italian, and French, as well as more unique languages like Turkish and Persian. Each language is broken down into several “levels” to work through as you progress.

There are a few ways you can use Rosetta Stone. You can opt for an online or app subscription, which gives you access to several levels of the program for a set number of months. Alternatively, you can download the software onto your computer or buy it on a CD-ROM. With these latter options, you pay a flat fee for each level of the program, and you get access to it forever.

How does it work?

To test out Rosetta Stone, I erican Spanish-I’m stuck at home, so what else do I have to do? In high school, I took several years of French (le langage de l’amour!), so I’m a true beginner when it comes to Spanish. Starting out, I could say hello, goodbye, and count to 10, but that was it.

Selecting a “Plan” I tested out the online subscription via my laptop, and the first thing the app asked me to do was select a unique learning plan based on why I was using the tool. There are four options to choose from, and each one has specially-tailored lessons that focuses on relevant content:

  • Travel: Meeting people, dining out, staying in a hotel, directions, and locations.
  • Family: Family relationships, complements, special occasions, and general correspondence.
  • Work: Politeness in a business setting, invitations, time, money, materials, and merchandise.
  • Basics & Beyond: Everyday items, daily routine, colors, sizes, as well as formal and informal situations.

I went with Basics & Beyond, and the program recommended I aim to practice for around 30 minutes a day, five times a week. From there, I jumped into learning Spanish!

If you’re thinking about learning a new language-whether because you’re bored in quarantine, planning an international move, or just want to be more cultured-chances are Rosetta Stone is one of the first language-learning programs that pops into your head. This system has been around since 1992, when it used to require CD-ROMs (remember those?), and it’s arguably the best-known tool for learning a new language.

However, Rosetta Stone isn’t cheap-prices start at $80 for a three-month subscription-and you might be wondering if it’s really better than free language-learning apps like Duolingo or other less expensive options like Mondly. After testing the program for around a month, here’s what we think you need to know about Rosetta Stone-and whether it’s worth your hard-earned money.

What is Rosetta Stone?

As you may have figured out by now, Rosetta Stone is a computer-assisted language-learning tool, and today, it offers 24 language programs, including both popular options like Spanish, Italian, and French, as well as more unique languages like Turkish and Persian. Each language is broken down into several “levels” to work through as you progress.

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